• 08.00 – Civilians trying to escape their homes in Moore Street are being shot by the British. • 12.00 – The naval bombardment of Liberty Hall has effectively destroyed the building. British troops moving down North King Street are attacked by rebels inside Langan’s Pub. The Dublin Fusiliers come under attack near City Hall as they attempt to dislodge rebels from the Evening Mail offices. • 14.15 – Attention shifts from the Mendicity Institution and the Four Courts becomes the next battleground. (Image: UCD). • 10.20 – 2/5th and 2/6th Sherwood Foresters and the 3rd Royal Irish Regiment are ordered to close in on the GPO from the west and the 5th Leinsters join the eastern cordon. The fighting ceases at around 16.00 in the afternoon. The two men drive to St Enda’s at midnight and confront Pearse who tells them that they are powerless to stop the Rising from taking place. Casualty figures continue to rise. • 09.45 – The rebels in North Brunswick Street surrender and 50 men are taken into custody. (Image: South Dublin County Libraries). Some 3000 are arrested and 1400 imprisoned. • 16.45 – 200 members of the Citizen Army take part in a route march through the centre of Dublin city. • 05.15 – British troops begin using improvised armoured cars to move men and materials more safely around Dublin. • 16.45 – Capel St Bridge taken by the British. More than 1,000 men and women are held prisoner by British authorities. Colonel Cowan orders 6th Reserve Cavalry to send a patrol to Sackville Street and for the three battalions of the Dublin Garrison to send men to defend Dublin Castle. En route they gather Colbert and his men from Marrowbone Lane. • 11.20 – While British troops have been trying to take the South Dublin Union for hours, they cannot dislodge the rebels who are firing at them. Aerial view of the GPO showing the damage done after the fighting. • 14.00 – The British have continued to rush troops into the city from across Ireland. The Plunkett’s estate at Larkfield, was known as the ‘Kimmage Garrison’ and men from Republican organisations in Britain arrived there in the weeks and months leading up to the 1916 Rising. • 17.00 – The fires in and around Sackville Street have taken hold, and are burning freely, and the shelling of the area continues unabated. The Easter Rising was a rebellion against British rule in Ireland . • 10.45 – By mid-morning all rebel held positions are surrounded by British troops. • 10.30 – The fire at the Irish Times building spreads quickly, and British troops are able to move forward under the cover of smoke as far as Middle Abbey Street. • 18.00 – Troops have finally forced their way into 25 Northumberland Road. Casement took refuge in McKenna’s fort, while the other two men attempted to make contact with the local IRB. • 20.25 – The Metropole Hotel has collapsed. • 13.10 – British troops have crossed Baggot Street Bridge and moved down the canal on Percy Place. Much of the area is destroyed and the fires still burn intensely. 5-6 SESE History. Michael Malone and James Grace are fortified inside 25 Northumberland Road and can fire freely at the advancing troops. (Image: Manchester Guardian History of the War, 1916). Decision taken that troops will open warehouses across the city and distribute food to civilians. • 14.00 – O’Farrell goes back to Boland’s Bakery with MacDonagh’s order that the 3rd Battalion accept the surrender order. In many of these houses, and in particular between 170 and 177 North King Street, soldiers attacked innocent men they believed were rebels. • 15.30 – Looting begins across the city as people take advantage of the upheaval and the apparent lack of law and order. Seán Heuston leads his exhausted men out of the building and they are taken prisoner. These attacks have now ended, but in the last few hours the soldiers have bayoneted or shot 15 innocent men. • 15.00 – British 18-pounder artillery based at Grangegorman Asylum opens fire on rebel positions in the Phibsboro area. The meeting decides to go ahead with the Rising beginning at noon on Easter Monday. Both images from Dublin after the six days' insurrection by T W  Murphy. The HMY Helga has now turned its guns on targets on Sackville Street. • 18.45 – The schoolhouse is taken by the British but actually found to be empty. • 14.30 – The Irish Citizen Army meets at Liberty Hall. 1916 Easter Rising 16risingproject. He issues orders to the Volunteers to ignore Pearse’s plans and instructs them that in future they must only obey orders issued by MacNeill himself. • 16.35 – Renewed fighting at the South Dublin Union. • 20.00 – The army attack on City Hall continues and the interior of the building has been cleared with rebels retaining control of the roof. • 11.55 – GPO seized by rebels. Ironically, though many in what is now the south wanted independence, they did not support the ways of movements such as the Fenians and the IRB. A series of courts martials begin on 2 May, and 90 men are sentenced to death. Sunday, 23 April, 1916 • 17.30 – Rebels have secured positions on all sides of O’Connell Street Bridge. Fires start burning in the building. J.J. O’Connell is dispatched to Cork in an attempt to halt the Rising there. 1932: Fianna Fáil wins the general election; Sinn Féin fades into political isolation. • 6.45 – The leadership in Moore Street has decided on a diversionary attack against the enemy on Great Britain Street. • 12.45 – A further wave of Sherwood Foresters is sent down Northumberland Road in an attempt to dislodge Malone and Grace. 1949: Ireland is formally declared a republic (according to the Republic of Ireland Act 1948), cutting its last constitutional ties to the British monarchy. Postcard depicting the fires that engulfed buildings along Sackville (O'Connell) Street during the rebellion. • MacNeill spends the early morning trying to halt the Rising. It is agreed that O’Farrell will return to Moore Street and then convey the surrender to rebel positions across the city. The vehicles have come from the Guinness factory. In Galway the local Volunteers have dispersed on news of the surrender. The 1916 Proclamation readout at the GPO by Captain Peter Kelleher during the recent centenary commemorations. Padraig Pearse reads the proclamation of the Irish Republic outside the General Post Office, the rebels’ headquarters. • 12.35 – The Mendicity Institution is taken by Volunteers and its residents forced onto the street. See more ideas about Easter rising, Ireland, Irish history. All rebels remaining in the building are taken prisoner. • 16.30 – Trains carrying the main body of troops from the Curragh begin to arrive at Kingsbridge at 15-20 minute intervals. Sunday, 30 April, 1916 READ: The Easter Rising and destruction of Dublin, Abducted women released unhurt, but distressed and hungry, Dublin’s homeless crisis becoming more acute, Briand appointed French Prime Minister for fourth time, Prohibition one year on - 14,000 illicit distillers now at work in United States, NEWSLETTER: Subscribe and get Century Ireland straight to your inbox, RTÉ History Show: The Women’s Suffrage Movement, WATCH: Centenary Commemoration of the Soloheadbeg Ambush, Explainer: The Democratic Programme of the First Dáil, Department of the Century, Heritage and Gaeltacht. • 20.00 – The journalist and pacifist. • 07.00 – At Carnmore, County Galway, in an exchange of fire between Volunteers and the RIC, two policemen have been killed. • 21.00 – News reaches Enniscorthy of the surrender. The rebels are on the roof, while soldiers on the street fire at their positions. • 14.40 – A number of British artillery positions have been established around Sackville Street and have begun shelling the main rebel strongholds. They are aged and unarmed but come under fire from Volunteers on Northumberland Road. Fighting continues in St Stephen’s Green between the British holding several key vantage points and the rebels based on the roof of the Royal College of Surgeons. • 20.30 – The O’Rahilly has been killed. At first, the Rising was very unpopular with people in Dublin and throughout the rest of Ireland. The Fingal Battalion under Thomas Ashe attack the RIC barracks at Ashbourne. RTÉ.ie is the website of Raidió Teilifís Éireann, Ireland's National Public Service Media. He also contacts the Curragh by phone and asks that the mobile column of the 3rd Reserve Cavalry is sent to Dublin. • 12.40 – The Sherwood Foresters enter Northumberland and come under intense fire. • 19.00 – Fighting continues around the Four Courts and the British are now using artillery to shell the building. A suggested timeline is included in the resource (1848 to 1916). The Enniscorthy Volunteers will finally surrender to the British on Monday morning. Pearse and Elizabeth O'Farrell surrendering to the military. • 12.00 – British ammunition convoy ambushed near Four Courts. It began on April 24, 1916, which was the day after Easter that year, and lasted five days. Eight policemen and two volunteers are killed. The truce allows all the casualties that were being treated in Father Mathew Hall to be removed. Shops, businesses and banks closed. It took place in the capital city, Dublin. • 18.00 – Rebels in Galway have attempted to take control of RIC barracks at Oranmore and Clarinbridge. The Council also agrees who will form the provisional government, the seven of whom will also put their names to the Proclamation. • 18.55 – The frontal assault on Clanwilliam House continues, but the intense fire from the seven Volunteers in the building means that troops are struggling to even cross Mount St Bridge. • 14.45 – Intense gun battle between rebels and British troops around Broadstone Railway Station. An 18-pound shell hits the Irish Times building and ignites rolls of newsprint. The order is included in the day’s paper for distribution on Sunday morning. In the Royal College of Surgeons, the South Dublin Union and the Four Courts the rebels sit tight, whereas in Boland’s Bakery there is discussion of a break out. • 18.30 – The Sherwood Foresters move past the Parochial House on Northumberland Road. Mar 7, 2016 - Anything to do with the 1916 Rising in Ireland and particularly Limerick. Doctors and nurses from a local hospital have gone to the area to treat the injured. He is shot, and drags himself to the back of Kelly’s shop, 25 Moore Street. The IRA Nominal • 12.17 – Rebels attack Magazine Fort in Phoenix Park. Previously, in "A long way to independence" The Unionists of Ulster and the Nationalists of the rest of the island both got involved in the WWI to get the support of England for their ideas. Other civilians are being killed and injured in the crossfire. • 18.00 – Fighting is intense around North King Street. A timeline created with Timetoast's interactive timeline maker. Within minutes there are a large number of dead and injured troops on the street. • 14.10 – Extensive fighting on North King Street. A timeline of the most important events around the 1916 Easter Rising. • 14.40 – British troops have been moved into positions across the city and an effective British cordon around rebel positions in the city is complete. The Supreme Council of the IRB met on 5 September 1914, a month after the United Kingdom declared war on Germany. • 14.50 – The 120 members of the Royal College of Surgeons garrison formally surrender, and are marched away. • 17.20 – Troops recently arrived at Kingsbridge Station have made their way to Dame Street and are engaged in a fierce battle with the rebels at City Hall. • 07.00 – The number of British troops now stationed at Trinity College is estimated to be as high as 4,000. • 18.15 – Fighting continues around the Four Courts, with rebels setting fire to buildings in an attempt to hamper the military advance. She is then returned to Moore Street to relay the message to the rebel leaders. They hand over their weapons and in the evening march under guard to the Rotunda arriving there at 20.00. They are joined by members of the Irish Citizen Army. • 19.00 – Officer Training Corps and porters defending Trinity College reinforced by numbers of British and colonial servicemen on leave in Dublin. 24 April 1916: The Rising begins on Easter Monday. • 03.20 – Troops take control of Royal Services Club on St Stephen’s Green. • 12.15 – Intense fighting is taking place at the Mendicity Institution and has been continuing for two hours. (R) (Image: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA). 10pm Eóin MacNeill issues the Countermanding order in Dublin to try to stop the Rising. • 00.01 – Fire out of control in Sackville Street and the Dublin Fire Brigade is stood down due to danger of small arms fire in the area. As they try to move around the city they come under fire from positions held by the rebels. All their attempts fail, and the rebels hold their positions. • 13.10 – Volunteers take buildings around Fumbally Lane and Malpas St. • 13.00 – Despite the white flag on Moore Street fighting continues on Church Street and Brunswick Street. Five rebels have died in the fighting, four have been arrested and a remaining five have evaded arrest. • 20.00 – While the former GPO garrison and those from the Four Courts have surrendered and been taken prisoner, the other outposts are not aware of the surrender and spend the night on alert. • In the morning the captain of the Aud makes the decision to scuttle his ship. • A meeting of the Military Council was hastily organised, and the decision taken not to inform MacNeill about Casement’s arrest. 1922: Provisional Government of the Irish Free State takes office; Irish Civil War breaks out between the Free State, led by Michael Collins and the Free State forces, and anti-treaty republicans, led by Éamon de Valera and the Irish Republican Army (IRA). • 13.00 – Continued fighting around the Four Courts with the rebels now under intense fire from shells being launched from the roof of Jervis Street Hospital. 3–12 May: 15 republicans (included the Rising’s seven leaders) are court-martialled and executed, with a final, single execution on 3 August (Roger Casement). In all 447 people have been killed, including 252 civilians, and 2,585 wounded. By Editor | 04/01/2016 | 1. Pearse records that by a majority vote the leaders decided to seek surrender terms to prevent further slaughter of the civilian population. • 14.25 – Lowe informs O’Farrell that he expects an unconditional surrender from Pearse within 30 minutes. • 13.40 – British cavalry attacked as they pass the Four Courts. Shortly afterwards a Volunteer is killed by British forces. • 10.35 – In Marrowbone Lane the latest British attack on rebel positions has been repulsed. • 09.00 – The Military Council begins a four hour meeting to discuss what to do in light of MacNeill’s countermanding order. 10 Jan: Evacuation of allied forces from Gallipoli completed. • 15.15 – James Connolly wounded by a ricochet as he watched fighting on Middle Abbey Street. The illegal executions would prove one of the most controversial incidents of Easter Week 1916, leading to the army officer’s trial in which he was found guilty but insane. Troops from Richmond Barracks are attacked at the South Dublin Union, while others are engaged in Portobello. (Images: National Library of Ireland). Nearby Volunteers also take control of the Four Courts. • 08.30 – 2/4th Lincolns throw a cordon around de Valera’s 3rd battalion based at Boland's Bakery. An Easter Rising timeline: Monday, April 24th, 1916 The second in a daily series of reportage-style pieces by the authors of When The Clock Struck in … Looting has also been a night time feature on the main shopping streets of the city. • 15.15 – The 6th Reserve Cavalry moves into the Phibsboro area and two hours later have largely secured the area. Attack fails, but teenage son of fort’s commandant is killed. The two sides are firing at each other at point blank range. • 12.35 – Lord Wimborne orders the 6th Reserve Cavalry to send detachments to defend the Magazine Fort and Viceregal Lodge in Phoenix Park. In all 15 men are executed, including Roger Casement who is hanged on 3 August in London. Responsibility for the planning of the rising was given to Tom Clarke and Sean Mac Dermott. Joseph Plunkett, a signatory of the 1916 Proclamation, had a keen interest in wireless technology since his youth. Saturday, 29 April, 1916 • 03.45 – Brigadier Lowe arrives at Kingsbridge with remainder of 25th Reserve Infantry Brigade and takes personal control of British forces. • 11.40 – Members of the Irish Citizen Army take control of St Stephen’s Green, and Volunteers have entered the South Dublin Union. Easter 1916: An uprising against British rule in ireland is planned by a small group of rebels to take place on Easter Sunday, 1916. The British put over 1,500 men onto the street during the day and four officers and 216 other ranks have been killed or seriously wounded. The Century Ireland project is an online historical newspaper that tells the story of the events of Irish life a century ago. April 1916 statt. • At dawn a messenger from the Kerry Volunteers arrived in Dublin and informed Connolly that Casement had been arrested. St Stephen's Green where the rebels stationed themselves on Monday (L) and the Shelbourne Hotel, seen from St Stephen's Green, where a group of soldiers secured positions to allow them to take military control. Friday, 28 April, 1916 1937: De Valera drafts a new constitution, establishing Ireland’s national sovereignty. • 19.40 – The occupation of the GPO has ended. Add to My Favourites. Gleichzeitig wurden die verschiedenen Widerstandsgruppen zur Irish Republican Army verschmolzen. • 19.30 – Captain Elliotson of the Curragh Mobile Column conducts reconnaissance of rebel positions around City Hall and the Rates Office, which is shortly followed by a full scale attack on the rebels holding City Hall. • 08.00 – The news that Martial Law has been proclaimed by British authorities is announced. By early afternoon the Military Council are made aware of the loss of their arms shipment. • 19.45 – The rebels from Moore Street are brought into Sackville Street, and march in formation to the Rotunda where they are to be held for the night. • 19.30 – The British have taken buildings across the street from rebel positions on North King Street. Cowan (Army), Major Ivon Price (Military Intelligence), Chief Commissioner Edgeworth-Johnstone (Dublin Metropolitan Police) and Viscount Wimborne (Lord Lieutenant of Ireland). • In the evening Bulmer Hobson, as a moderate within the Volunteer leadership who opposed the Rising, was taken prisoner by the IRB at 76 Cabra Park. At the same time the Military Council held what they believed would be their last meeting prior to the commencement of the Rising at Houlihan’s Shop on Amiens Street. Bowen-Colthurst will be found guilty of unlawful killing but found to be insane. • 21.00 – The rebels on Moore Street are under constant fire from British positions at the Rotunda. Fighting does continue around North King Street where the British are still trying to take rebel-held positions. • 21.00 – The fighting has ceased in the Northumberland Road area. Even once it had started, few Dubliners took the opportunity to join the rebels. • 22.00 – A conference is held at the Viceregal Lodge in Phoenix Park to discuss the events of the last few days. As he did not receive the telegram asking for his opinion until Easter Monday, no preemptive action is taken by the British. The decision is made to temporarily halt the British attack on the Union building. If that did not happen Lowe stated that he would resume hostilities. • 10.40 – Firing reported in Merrion Square and St Stephen’s Green. 1920: British parliament’s Government of Ireland Act partitions Northern and Southern Ireland. • During the evening, General Friend, General Officer Commanding of British forces in Ireland, travelled to London on leave in wake of the capture of the Aud believing that any potential insurgency had been stopped. • 23.15 – The rebels have stormed into the Gasworks on South Lotts Road and dismantled the machinery there which has left much of the south side of the city in darkness.